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The Everyday Prayer

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Icon of the Holy Face
Church of Sant'Egidio, Rome

Memory of Oscar Arnulfo Romero, archbishop of San Salvador. He was killed on March 24, 1980 on the altar. Memory of the massacre of the Fosse Ardeatine that took place in Rome in 1944, in which the Nazis killed 335 people.

Reading of the Word of God

Praise to you, o Lord, King of eternal glory

Whoever lives and believes in me
will never die.

Praise to you, o Lord, King of eternal glory

1 Timothy 6, 17-19

Instruct those who are rich in this world's goods that they should not be proud and should set their hopes not on money, which is untrustworthy, but on God who gives us richly all that we need for our happiness.

They are to do good and be rich in good works, generous in giving and always ready to share-

this is the way they can amass a good capital sum for the future if they want to possess the only life that is real.


Praise to you, o Lord, King of eternal glory

If you believe, you will see the glory of God,
thus says the Lord.

Praise to you, o Lord, King of eternal glory

After praising God, Paul adds a footnote in which he gives Timothy instructions concerning the rich people in the community. He has already put Timothy on guard against the desire for wealth (6:9-10). Now he is giving instructions on the correct use of wealth. The apostle warns that even wealth gained by legitimate means can be full of dangers for those who possess it. And he warns Timothy not to put his hope in wealth because it is always "uncertain." Hope is only solid when set in God. Wealth is given so that all may enjoy it and that the poor may be helped. Christians should only put their trust in the paternal goodness of God, who gives his children everything they need. This is why Jesus can admonish the disciples, "Therefore I tell you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat or what you will drink, or about your body, what you will wear... for it is the Gentiles who strive for all these things; and indeed your heavenly Father knows that you need all these things" (Mt 6:25-32). The rich should not selfishly close up at the sight of their neighbour’s need. They are called to make their love for those who are poorer more concrete. The wealthy Christian should know that true wealth consists in being rich with good works; they will be "the treasure of a good foundation" for him. By doing good works, a Christian becomes "rich toward God" (Lk 12:21) and stores up "treasures in heaven" (Mt 6:20) and the Father "who sees in secret will reward him" (Mt 6:4). In the last two verses, Paul summarizes once again the two central exhortations of the letter: to preserve the Christian faith and to guard it strongly against heresy so that the community may not be divided. Timothy’s primary responsibility and his mission are to keep the Gospel pure and whole. And the Gospel is quite different from the "chatter" of human "knowledge." Knowledge is good, but not for salvation. Only the Word illuminates and guides our steps towards heaven. At the end of the letter Paul says farewell to Timothy and the entire community, about whom he thinks incessantly, and he asks God to give them all the grace that "brings salvation."

Sunday Vigil