Riccardi Andrea: on the web

Riccardi Andrea: on social networks

change language
you are in: home - prayer - the everyday prayer contacting usnewsletterlink

Donation Topbar


The Everyday Prayer

printable version

Icon of the Holy Face
Church of Sant'Egidio, Rome

Reading of the Word of God

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

I am the good shepherd,
my sheep listen to my voice,
and they become
one flock and one fold.

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

Jude 1, 24-25

To him who can keep you from falling and bring you safe to his glorious presence, innocent and joyful,

to the only God, our Saviour, through Jesus Christ our Lord, be glory, majesty, authority and power, before all ages, now and for ever. Amen.


Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

I give you a new commandment,
that you love one another.

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

Jude concludes his letter by praising God in what is called a doxology, a formula also found in other letters such as in the Letter to the Romans. In this letter, Jude also presents one of his prayers for the communities to which he writes. Praise for God concludes Jude’s letter as it also should be the heart of each believer’s prayer. For, whenever we turn to God, either in difficulties or in lament, we should praise him and acknowledge the greatness of his love and of his help. Jude entrusts the communities to the one Lord who is strong and powerful. God not only keeps them "from falling," but preserves them so that they may stand without blemish in the presence of his glory with rejoicing. The apostle encompasses the entire history of the Church and sees her conclusion when the Church will be without blemish and full of the joy of the saints. Jude knows well that his exhortations and his warnings are important because they are written with the authority of the Lord, and he is also fully aware that only the Lord is the strong and good Shepherd who can lead and protect his Church. This is why his exhortations turn into prayer and prayer becomes the most robust help that he can give to the Christians to whom he writes. It is also an invitation to us that we, too, learn to pray for others. There is a ministry in prayer that must involve all Christian communities in a much larger way than what currently is happening. There should be in the entire world a sort of universal cathedral of prayer where brothers and sisters of the world are gathered to praise God and help each other. The one God, through his only Son, receives praise from this unique but internally diverse spiritual house that lets us experience the kingdom of love and peace on earth today.

Memory of the Church