Riccardi Andrea: on the web

Riccardi Andrea: on social networks

change language
you are in: home - prayer - the everyday prayer contacting usnewsletterlink

Donation Topbar


The Everyday Prayer

printable version

Icon of the Holy Face
Church of Sant'Egidio, Rome

Reading of the Word of God

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

This is the Gospel of the poor,
liberation for the imprisoned,
sight for the blind,
freedom for the oppressed.

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

Luke 10, 13-16

'Alas for you, Chorazin! Alas for you, Bethsaida! For if the miracles done in you had been done in Tyre and Sidon, they would have repented long ago, sitting in sackcloth and ashes.

And still, it will be more bearable for Tyre and Sidon at the Judgement than for you.

And as for you, Capernaum, did you want to be raised high as heaven? You shall be flung down to hell.

'Anyone who listens to you listens to me; anyone who rejects you rejects me, and those who reject me reject the one who sent me.'


Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

The Son of Man came to serve,
whoever wants to be great
should become servant of all.

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

This Gospel passage comes in the middle of the instructions Jesus gives to the seventy-two disciples, which we heard yesterday. Jesus has just urged them to travel to every city to preach the Gospel. But he adds that if any of these cities do not accept their preaching, they should leave, even shaking the dust off their sandals. At this point Jesus speaks directly to Chorazin and Bethsaida, two cities of Galilee, threatening them with ruin. Despite the fact that Jesus himself had preached there and performed many miracles, they changed neither their lives nor their sinful behaviour. To these two he adds Capernaum, the city he had chosen as his new home with the Twelve. Despite having been privileged with Jesus’ physical presence, Capernaum did not return the love that it had been shown but remained deaf and ungrateful, continuing to live in a dissolute and corrupt way. Instead of being exalted, it will be brought down and humiliated. These are harsh words, and they should make us question how the life of our cities is organized. How often are the cities of today deaf to the preaching of the Gospel? As disciples of Jesus, certainly we have to ask ourselves whether we know how to communicate the Gospel to the hearts of our cities and peoples. We often risk wearily repeating doctrines and rites that pass over people without bringing about any change. We need to ask ourselves whether we are truly a leavening of brotherhood and love or whether we are unwitting accomplices - unwitting but not guiltless - of the individualism that makes our cities so sad and violent. Jesus’ own journey to Jerusalem shows us how, as Christians, we must enter our cities and affirm that Jesus is the savoir, not the countless myths and powers that crush the lives of the millions and millions of poor and weak people who live on the edges of today’s metropolises. Jesus goes to Jerusalem to give his life, to be the first leavening, the first light, the first seed of a new city, built to human scale. Those who do not welcome him, or, worse, refuse him, are cultivating their own ruin. Even Tyre and Sidon - Jesus says - would have converted if they could have heard the words and seen the works that were being performed at that time. Let us not let the Gospel be preached in vain. We must be aware of our responsibility towards the great cities of today, which the Lord has entrusted to us: “Whoever listens to you listens to me, and whoever rejects you rejects me.” Every word that is preached comes from on high. This is a responsibility for those who preach and those who listen.

Memory of Jesus crucified