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The Everyday Prayer

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Icon of the Holy Face
Church of Sant'Egidio, Rome

Memorial of St. Catherine of Siena (1347-1380); she worked for peace, for the unity of Christians, and for the poor.

Reading of the Word of God

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

You are a chosen race,
a royal priesthood, a holy nation,
a people acquired by God
to proclaim his marvellous works.

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

John 12, 44-50

Jesus declared publicly: Whoever believes in me believes not in me but in the one who sent me,

and whoever sees me, sees the one who sent me.

I have come into the world as light, to prevent anyone who believes in me from staying in the dark any more.

If anyone hears my words and does not keep them faithfully, it is not I who shall judge such a person, since I have come not to judge the world, but to save the world:

anyone who rejects me and refuses my words has his judge already: the word itself that I have spoken will be his judge on the last day.

For I have not spoken of my own accord; but the Father who sent me commanded me what to say and what to speak,

and I know that his commands mean eternal life. And therefore what the Father has told me is what I speak.


Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

You will be holy,
because I am holy, thus says the Lord.

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

The Gospel shows us Jesus still in the temple while he talks openly about his mission. Actually, he cries it out loud, recalling as such the strength of the prophets, “Whoever believes in me believes not in me but in him who sent me. And whoever sees me sees him who sent me.” Jesus introduces himself not only as sent by the Father, but as one with Him. He leads us into the very heart of the Gospel message. He has come into the world as the true light which reveals the mystery of love that is hidden in God. Finally the Son has revealed to us: “I have not spoken on my own, but the Father who sent me has himself given me a commandment about what to say and what to speak.” An exegete of God, Jesus explains the love of the Father to us. The creator of heaven and earth wants salvation for everyone, as they are his children. Whoever listens to the words of the Son is saved, while whoever does not listen or rejects them will be condemned. It is about listening and taking care of the word of the Gospel, to welcome it and put it into practice, as he said at the end of the discourse on the mountain. Jesus spoke to save, not to condemn. He did not despise the flickering wick which risks being snuffed out for a small blow, nor the reed that could be cracked from one moment to the next. The true condemnation does not come from the Word of God, but from the little faith that we have in it: we do not believe that it can change hearts, that it can generate new feelings and actions. “The one who rejects me and does not receive my word has a judge; on the last day the word that I have spoken will serve as judge”: more than a judgment it is a constatation. In fact, if we do not welcome the Word of God and we do not make it come alive, how can he guide us, heal us, or make us happy? We will be condemned to listen only to ourselves and to remain prisoner to our small horizon. Instead, if we listen to the Gospel of Christ, we are introduced into the very mystery of God: “What I speak, therefore, I speak just as the Father has told me.” There is like a descending chain of love: the Father communicates to the Son the truth of his love, the Son, in turn, communicates it to us. Every time that we listen to the Word of God and we receive the Eucharist we are welcomed into the mystery of communion with the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. The Lord lowers himself to us to make us like Him.

Memory of the Saints and the Prophets