Memory of Jesus crucified

Deel Op


Reading of the Word of God

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

This is the Gospel of the poor,
liberation for the imprisoned,
sight for the blind,
freedom for the oppressed.

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

1 Timothy 6,2c-12

Anyone who teaches anything different and does not keep to the sound teaching which is that of our Lord Jesus Christ, the doctrine which is in accordance with true religion, is proud and has no understanding, but rather a weakness for questioning everything and arguing about words. All that can come of this is jealousy, contention, abuse and evil mistrust; and unending disputes by people who are depraved in mind and deprived of truth, and imagine that religion is a way of making a profit. Religion, of course, does bring large profits, but only to those who are content with what they have. We brought nothing into the world, and we can take nothing out of it; but as long as we have food and clothing, we shall be content with that. People who long to be rich are a prey to trial; they get trapped into all sorts of foolish and harmful ambitions which plunge people into ruin and destruction. 'The love of money is the root of all evils' and there are some who, pursuing it, have wandered away from the faith and so given their souls any number of fatal wounds. But, as someone dedicated to God, avoid all that. You must aim to be upright and religious, filled with faith and love, perseverance and gentleness. Fight the good fight of faith and win the eternal life to which you were called and for which you made your noble profession of faith before many witnesses.

 

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

The Son of Man came to serve,
whoever wants to be great
should become servant of all.

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

The apostle warns Timothy for a third time against those who misinterpret the Gospel's teaching (1:3-20; 4:1-11). They separate themselves from the community, as they do not follow the sound words of the Lord; the only words that can save them, freeing them from sin and death. Those who let their pride dominate are finally subdued: they see only themselves. They are "conceited, understand nothing, and have a morbid craving for controversy and for disputes about words." This arrogant and vain attitude is not harmless; it is dangerous to them and to the Christian community. Pride destroys fraternal love, which is the highest feature of the community. The bitter fruits are "envy, dissension, slander, base suspicion" and conflicts. The apostle dwells strongly upon the abuse of religion as a means of personal gain by the heretic. The disciple behaves in the opposite way: "Godliness is valuable in every way, holding promise for both the present life and the life to come" (4:8). When life is guided by faith, it causes great holds gain for the present and for eternity. Faith must be accompanied by meekness, contentment, freedom from the love of money, and a contentedness in the gifts of God. To highlight the correct approach towards earthly goods, the apostle recalls a concept expressed already in Scripture: we brought nothing into the world, just as we shall not be able to take anything out of it. This saying comes from an ancient wisdom, which neither despises earthly goods, nor glorifies them to the point of becoming their slaves.