Memory of the apostles

Deel Op

Feast of the Apostle Andrew


Reading of the Word of God

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

If we die with him, we shall live with him,
if with him we endure, with him we shall reign.

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

Matthew 4,18-22

As he was walking by the Lake of Galilee he saw two brothers, Simon, who was called Peter, and his brother Andrew; they were making a cast into the lake with their net, for they were fishermen. And he said to them, 'Come after me and I will make you fishers of people.' And at once they left their nets and followed him. Going on from there he saw another pair of brothers, James son of Zebedee and his brother John; they were in their boat with their father Zebedee, mending their nets, and he called them. And at once, leaving the boat and their father, they followed him.

 

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

If we die with him, we shall live with him,
if with him we endure, with him we shall reign.

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

Today the Church remembers the apostle Andrew, the first of those who were called. This memory reminds us that Christians are primarily disciples, believers who listen to the word of the Lord and follow him. This is why the story of the fist who was called - such as the narration of the Gospel of John presents us (1:40) - continues to be of example to us. Andrew, the son of Jonah and brother of Simon Peter, was from Bethsaida and worked as a fisherman with his brother. While he was mending the nets, Jesus, called him; he immediately left them and followed him. According to tradition Andrew proclaimed the Gospel in Syria, Asia Minor and Greece and he died in Patrassus crucified like his Master. Orthodoxy venerates him as the first bishop of the city of Constantinople. Jesus' invitation to follow him was a direct one: The Teacher explained God's future in the only way that those fishermen could understand, perhaps in the only way that can excite them, " Come and follow me, I will make you fish for people." Andrew and Simon, listen to the invitation, leave their nets and follow him. Andrew accepts Jesus' invitation. Jesus explains to the two their future in the only way they could understand, maybe the only one that could make them enthusiastic: You will still fish, but you will fish for people." It is an invitation that is addressed also to us in this time. In order to fish in this way, we need to leave the boat of always and start travelling not on the water anymore, but on the land of men and women of this time, a land even more fluid and uncertain than the waters of the lake. It is no longer the watery sea, but the sea of humanity often abandoned and lost. Jesu sis still looking for disciples like Andrew and this is why he continues to invite. Jesus himself is the first "fisher for people." He hopes also on us. It is not for us to decide whether we are worthy or not, or if anyone else is. From the Gospel's perspective, all we have to do is listen to the invitation, accept it, and respond. Following Jesus is not a choice for heroes or elected spirits. The first four disciples were simple fishermen: they listen to Jesus, trusted him and followed him