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New Zealand: an appeal to stop the propaganda of hate that encourages blind violence and racist

March 15 2019 - NEW ZEALAND

violenceRacism

The condolences of the Community of Sant Egidio to the families affected by the attack in the two New Zealand mosques – Important to multiply dialogue initiatives and favor integration policies

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The Community of Sant’Egidio expresses its deep condolences to the families affected by the horrific attack that took place yesterday in New Zealand in the two mosques of the city of Christchurch. In addition to the large number of victims and the condemnation that every citizen can and must express, it must be emphasized that the attack to places of worship, free spaces of prayer, represents also an
offense for believers, whatever religion they belong to.
Sant’Egidio expresses its solidarity with the New Zealand Muslim community, unjustly hit by this attack, in a country that has always been rich in religious, cultural and origin diversity. At the same time, it launches an appeal to stop hate propaganda in the West, which from the web and words has begun to pass, already for some time, to facts in a crescendo of violence and racism, taking on unacceptable
symbols and examples, accompanied by distorted historical reconstructions.
On the contrary, it is necessary to sow words of peace, facilitate opportunities for meeting and dialogue, and to encourage policies at all levels that lead to effective integration. This is the only viable solution in societies that are now indeed plural and that will never be able to solve their problems by raising walls, but rather looking with confidence to a future to be built together, already visible in many of its manifestations in Europe and elsewhere.



New Zealand: an appeal to stop the propaganda of hate that encourages blind violence and racist
New Zealand: an appeal to stop the propaganda of hate that encourages blind violence and racist
New Zealand: an appeal to stop the propaganda of hate that encourages blind violence and racist