Sunday Vigil

Deel Op

Prayer for the unity of Christians. Particular memory of the Christian communities in Africa.


Reading of the Word of God

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

Whoever lives and believes in me
will never die.

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

Mark 3,20-21

He went home again, and once more such a crowd collected that they could not even have a meal. When his relations heard of this, they set out to take charge of him; they said, 'He is out of his mind.'

 

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

If you believe, you will see the glory of God,
thus says the Lord.

Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia

Jesus returns home in Capernaum. Immediately, as every time, a large crowd forms around him, and presses insistently so that he could not even eat. For this crowd, as for all the crowds of the needy, Jesus is always moved to compassion for those people. He does not stop. He cannot let go succouring and consoling. This Gospel scene scandalizes the laziness that so many times marks our life. How often are we caught in our personal rhythms that respond only to our needs, leaving out completely any consideration for those in need of help? We should not let only ourselves always be the measure of our days and preoccupations. Egocentrism and focus on oneself mean betraying the mission Jesus entrusted to us. Today's crowds, the poor, the sick those who are alone are men and women that Jesus entrusted to our hands. We are responsible of them in first person. His relatives say of him: "He has gone out of his mind." Jesus had known these accusations directly. Since his childhood, when Jesus was only twelve and stayed in the temple discussing with the doctors of the law, even Mary and Joseph accused him. And when his worried parents rebuked him for his choice that was not proper according to them he answered: "Did you not know that I must be in my Father's house?" His family gathered in Capernaum that day even go so far as to say that Jesus "has gone out of his mind," that he is crazy, and they try to bring him back to normality. On the contrary, the Gospel is like a fire that burns and moves. It is a force of love that brings us out of ourselves, out of our small horizon to welcome that of God.